Bishops Candlesticks Essay

... Elizabeth Bishop is a highly admired writer. In her poem, “The Fish,” a reader can enjoy the very specific analysis of a fish. While it may seem confusing, there are certainly multiple ways of possibly interpreting this poem. The poem is a continuous, with no stanzas, description of a fish and also the relationship between her and the fish. While it may be gruesome and overly-descriptive, it leaves many questions for the reader. In Elizabeth Bishop’s poem, “The Fish” she uses similes, adjectives, and imagery to show the significance of inner beauty in people. During the poem, a reader can notice lots of smiles in order to describe the fish. Throughout the poem Bishop vividly describes the fish to the reader, and similes help make the poem more descriptive. A perfect example of this is when Bishop writes, “here and there his brown skin hung in strips like ancient wall-paper,” as she is explaining the appearance of the fish’s skin. This shows that, from the outside, the fish was decrepit- looking. A reader could tie this analysis into the theme because from the outside the fish looks old and worn out, but the reader has yet to find out more about the fish throughout the poem. Another example of a simile in the poem is when Bishop describes the lip of the fish. “I admired his sullen face, The mechanism of his jaw, And then I saw That from his lower lip --if you could call it a lip- Grim, wet, and weapon-like, Hung five old pieces of fish-line”...

...Elizabeth Bishop Biography Elizabeth Bishop (February 8, 1911 – October 6, 1979) once told her writing class at Harvard University, “Use the dictionary; It’s better than the critics.” Bishop’s wit and devotion to careful, precise language came through in her own writing, which earned her nearly every major poetry prize in the U.S. For Bishop, writing poetry was an act of “self-forgetfulness,” in which she focused on shaping and sharing her impressions of the physical world rather than on giving the details of her sometimes difficult personal life. When she was very young, her father died and her mother was permanently hospitalized, so Bishop was raised by relatives. After graduation from Vassar College in 1934, she traveled frequently and lived in many places, including Florida, New York, Europe, and Brazil. She kept in touch with people she met through thousands of letters, some which were collected and published in her book One Art. In 1934 Bishop was introduced to the poet Marianne Moore, who became Bishop’s valued friend and mentor. Bishop also became close to poet Robert Lowell, who provided unstinting moral support and helped her obtain grants, fellowships, and awards. They critiqued each other’s poetry and remained staunch allies throughout their lives. Described by many friends as generous and wise, Bishop was also complicated and intensely private. Though she...

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